UK Brexit Guidance Update (UK Brexit)

Exit day is 31st October.

Yesterday (18th July) HMG updated the guidance it had issued before the first exit day, to apprentice providers and persons operating further education collages – here.

[it also updated the guidance for schools]

This Blog does not cover employment law, or immigration law.

The Guidance is useful in that it summarises a range of matters, from travel and visas, to food supplies, and the situation for employing people after Brexit.

Please note there is no update to the (February issued) European temporary leave to remain instruction – here.

per the European temporary leave to remain instruction – EU, EEA and Swiss citizens who are granted European temporary leave to remain will be able to stay in the UK for 36 months from the date it is granted. European temporary leave to remain will be a temporary, non-extendable immigration status. It will not give indefinite leave to remain (ILR), lead to status under the EU Settlement Scheme or make EU, EEA and Swiss citizens eligible to stay in the UK indefinitely.

If EU, EEA and Swiss citizens want to stay in the UK for more than 36 months, they will need to apply for an immigration status under the new immigration system, which will come into effect from 1 January 2021. Those who do not qualify will need to leave the UK when their European temporary leave to remain expires.

If you’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen who enters the UK before the UK leaves the EU, you’re eligible to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme to continue living in the UK. EU, EEA or Swiss citizens and their families will be able to remain in the UK indefinitely if they are granted settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme.

If you’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen who arrives in the UK after the UK leaves the EU but were previously living in the UK before Brexit, you can also apply to the EU Settlement Scheme.

Irish citizens are excluded from the aboveIrish citizens will not need to apply for European temporary leave to remain. They’ll continue to have the right to enter and live in the UK under Common Travel Area arrangements.

Food Supplies (per the guidance to apprentice providers, and it’s also in the schools document – similar guidance is in the instructions for hospitals and care homes)

The government has been working to plan arrangements that ensure goods can continue to flow into the UK without significant delays from additional controls and checks. We are continuously engaging with a wide range of stakeholders to support industry preparedness. However, the government does not have control over the checks imposed by EU Member States at the EU side of the border.

The government, including the Department for Education, will continue to work with food suppliers to prepare for a no deal departure from the EU. Colleges have significant flexibilities in terms of how they provide food for students that are eligible for free meals.

We advise that you contact your food supplier(s) if your college procures food directly to ensure they are planning for potential impacts of a no deal scenario. For example, this may include plans to adapt menus to allow for product substitution.

This would also include seeking reassurance on the ability of suppliers to continue to provide nutritious meals and to accommodate special dietary needs and allergens when introducing any substitute products.

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