EU-UK Readiness post 1st Jan 2021 (EU 1st Jan 2021)

The European Commission published a Communication “Getting Ready for Changes. Communication on readiness at the end of the transition period between the European Union and the United Kingdom” today 9th July. This document is here.

The Communication is posted on the European Commission’s End of Transition Period Readiness Page here, where other notices, with various publication dates, are posted.

Key points in the 35 page Communication (this is not a full list):

(1) As of 1 January 2021, the European Union and the United Kingdom will be two separate regulatory and legal spaces.

(2) As of 1 January 2021, licences issued to railway undertakings by the United Kingdom will no longer be valid in the European Union, and certificates or licences issued in the United Kingdom to train drivers will no longer be valid for the operation of locomotives and trains on the EU’s railway system.

[I Blog posted recently specifically re Railways]

(3) As of 1 January 2021, air carriers holding operating licences granted by the UK licensing authority for the commercial carrying by air of passengers, mail and/or cargo, will no longer be able to provide air transport services within the European Union. EU air carriers and holders of aviation safety certificates will need to ensure, and uphold compliance with European Union requirements, including airlines’ requirements on principal place of business and EU majority ownership and control, as well as the European Union aviation safety acquis.

(4) As of 1 January 2021, road transport operators that are established in the United Kingdom will no longer hold a European Community licence. In the absence of a reciprocal access agreement, the limited quotas already available under the mechanism of the European Conference of Ministers of Transport (ECMT) will be available for EU operators to conduct journeys to the United Kingdom, and for UK operators to conduct journeys to the EU.

[I Blog posted in 2019 about this topic]

(5) As of 1 January 2021, EU REACH registrations held by manufacturers and producers established in the United Kingdom will no longer be valid in the European Union. These entities will have to ensure that their substances are registered with a manufacturer or importer in the European Union or appoint an ‘Only Representative’ in the European Union as registrant for the substance.

[A UK REACH will operate in the UK, I Blog posted about this in 2019]

(6) As of 1 January 2021, downstream users in the EU will have to check whether chemical substances they use are registered by a registrant established in the European Union. Where this is not the case, they should:

* check whether the UK registrant they deal with plans to appoint an ‘Only Representative’ in the European Union; or

* register the substance in the capacity of importer.

Re Northern Ireland specifics (this is not a full list)

(1) Checks and controls will take place on goods entering Northern Ireland from the rest of the United Kingdom, for example on food products and live animals to ensure adherence to sanitary and phytosanitary (‘SPS’) requirements. Goods leaving Northern Ireland to enter the EU must comply with EU standards and rules.

(2) EU customs duties will apply to goods entering Northern Ireland unless the Joint Committee (set up under the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol) sets out a framework of conditions under which these goods are considered not to be at risk of entering the EU’s Single Market. Based on such a framework, no customs duties will be payable if it can be demonstrated that goods entering Northern Ireland from the rest of the UK are not at risk of entering the EU’s Single Market.

EU Readiness Notices (EU Brexit)

The UK is exiting the transition period on 31st December.

The European Commission is reviewing – and where necessary updating – the over 100 sector-specific stakeholder preparedness notices it published during the Article 50 negotiations with the UK.

The documents (updated so far) are published as ‘notices for readiness’ for 1st January 2021 –

(1) Air Transport – here

(2) Aviation safety – here

(3) Consumer protection and passenger rights – here

(4) Cosmetic products – here

(5) Animal feed – here

(6) Food law – here

(7) Industrial products – here

(8) Medicinal products for human use and veterinary medical products – here

(9) Movements of live animals – here

(10) Online sale of goods with subsequent parcel delivery – here

(11) Plant health – here

The transition period ends on 31st December, unless it is extended by agreement.

New Website “EU Future Dealings with UK” (EU Brexit)

Transition Period ends 1st January 2021

The EU has set up a new gateway to information on its dealings with the UK – here.

If there is no ratified agreement establishing a future trade deal between the EU and the UK at the end of the transition period, then the United Kingdom will trade with the EU on World Trade Organization terms as of 1 January 2021.

Even if a trade agreement is concluded, it will establish a very different relationship in terms of market access than participating in the EU’s Internal Market and the EU’s Customs Union.

Therefore, the end of the transition period means significant changes in the regulatory relationship between the UK and the EU.

Since Autumn 2017, the EU has Stakeholder Preparedness Notices which set out the instructions for No Deal (in the Article 50 phase). I Blog posted about these a number of times in 2018.

The EU now (in this new gateway) has a new page (from this new gateway) with access to the EU’s No Deal Preparations and the EU’s Stakeholder Preparedness Notices (which are being updated) – here.

Northern Ireland

Please remember (under the terms of the Withdrawal Agreement) Northern Ireland will remain aligned to some EU Law.

Northern Ireland will remain aligned to a limited set of rules related to the EU’s Single Market in order to avoid a hard border: legislation on goods (including Environment), sanitary rules for veterinary controls (“SPS rules”), rules on agricultural production/marketing, VAT and excise in respect of goods, and state aid rules.

The list of rules is in an Annex to the Ireland/Northern Ireland Protocol. It’s not easy to find this list. I hope in the future both the EU and the UK set up specific gateways for Northern Ireland.

6th Brexit Preparedness (EU Exit)

Exit day is 31st October (unless a later date is sought by the UK and agreed by the EU)

Yesterday (3rd September) the EU issued its 6th Brexit Preparedness Package. Here.

This contains an updated Brexit Checklist here.

Please read this September 2019 Brexit Preparedness Checklist carefully.

Core actions to be checked are set out in boxes.

Please note the unilateral extension of some timelines in the EU contingency measures here.

Imported Clothing Labelling (UK Brexit)

Exit day is 31st October.

HMG has yesterday issued two instructions confirming the no change situation re shoes and textiles labelling on imports, bar the manufacturer’s authorised agent must be based in the UK (not the EU).

Footwear – here.

Textiles – here.

Exports to the EU will need to comply with EU rules for imports from third countries.

EU Brexit Preparedness Notices – here.

EU Brexit Customs and Taxation and related information – here.

EU Brexit Preparedness (EU Brexit)

UK Exit day is 31st October 2019

Please read this Blog post carefully, if you have any questions or uncertainties as to your actions, please email to arrange a telecon.

Today, 12th June, the EU Commission published its fifth Brexit Preparedness Communication – it is a review of the state of the EU Brexit preparedness and contingency measures, and is important for activities in the EU and in the UK. The document is here.

Key elements :

(1) As stated in the fourth Brexit Preparedness Communication of 10 April 2019, the Commission is ready to propose financial support measures (applicable to the E27) to mitigate the impact in the most affected areas and sectors, taking into account the funds that are available and any adjustments on the expenditure and revenue side of the EU budget that might result from a disorderly withdrawal. For more immediate support to affected stakeholders, EU State aid rules offer flexible solutions for national measures. But see Item (4) below.

(2) In this review, the Commission screened all the EU-level measures to assess whether they are still fit for purpose given the extension of the Article 50(3) TEU period. On the basis of this screening, the Commission considers that the legislative and non-legislative Union acts continue to meet their intended objectives. There is therefore no need to amend them on substance. The Commission does not plan any new measures ahead of the new withdrawal date (31st October).

(3) The Commission adopted 16 non-legislative contingency acts under the EU sanitary and phytosanitary legislation in view of the previous withdrawal date of 12 April 2019 on the basis of assurances given by the United Kingdom. These measures are now obsolete due to the extension. However, if the United Kingdom continues to provide the necessary assurances, the measures will be re-adopted to apply as of 1 November 2019.

These acts cover the listing of the United Kingdom and its Crown Dependencies as a third country allowed to export live animals and animal products to the EU; and the approval of new or extended Border Inspection Posts in the EU27 Member States most concerned by UK imports.

They do not cover acts on the recognition of health marks for products of animal origin, heat treated pallets, or fortified flour (UK requests).

(4) In some sectors, companies indicated in March 2019 that they had not had sufficient time to adapt. The Commission strongly encourages stakeholders to take advantage of the extra time until 31 October 2019 to ensure that they have taken all the necessary action to prepare for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal.

They should ensure that the necessary regulatory authorisations are in place, that they have taken the administrative steps for cross-border trade and the necessary action for relocation, corporate reorganisation or contractual adaptations.

In particular, it will not be possible to place on the EU market after Exit day products which do not comply with the necessary requirements and authorisations.

As stated above, the Commission does not plan to adopt any new measure in view of a possible no-deal scenario or to compensate for a failure to prepare by operators.

The Commission considers that the additional time available because of the extension will in principle be sufficient for operators to adapt, so that even in cases where exemptions or derogations are available, they should not be necessary.

(5) EU27 Member States should screen their national contingency measures to ensure that they remain fit for purpose given the extension of the Article 50(3) period. In case of a no-deal withdrawal, the final preparatory measures must apply as of 1 November 2019 at the latest.

(6) Note the specifics on medicinal products, medical devices and chemical substances – page 5 of the document (link above).

(7) In the field of sanitary and phytosanitary controls (SPS), EU27 Member States have set up new Border Inspection Posts (BIPs) or extended existing ones at entry points of imports from the United Kingdom into the EU. As stated above, the non-legislative act approving these BIPs will need to be adopted again given the most recent extension of the Article 50(3) period. In the meantime, EU27 Member States should use the additional time to evaluate the need for any further adjustments to these BIPs to ensure that they are fully functional from the outset.

Furthermore, the Commission maintains regular contacts with the most concerned Member States so that, in a no-deal scenario, a landbridge route between Ireland and the rest of the European Union via the United Kingdom can be implemented swiftly, including support from the necessary IT systems.

(8) The international road haulage measure expiry deadline of 31st Dec 2019 is unaltered.

It is important companies review their supply contracts, and ensure suppliers are Brexit ready.

UK Industrial Goods Export to EU (EU Brexit)

Exit day is 31st October 2019.

The EU issued in February a Q&A document answering questions arising on the specifics of UK Industrial Goods circulation in the European market following Exit. This document is here.

Please examine this document carefully, particularly as respects the point in the circulation when the Third Country regime would apply, and the matter of Technical Dossier transfer (Category D).

Any questions not addressed by this Q&A should be made to the UK BEIS department.

The UK has said it would permit CE marked Goods to circulate in the UK market after Exit day, as far as I can determine, this is not reciprocated by the EU (as respects UKCA marked Goods). If anyone has an update on this, perhaps they would email me it. Thank you.

[the Exit day may change, please continue to follow this Blog]

Brexit is 31st October 2019 (UK-EU Brexit)

UPDATE : the Exit day is 31st October 2019 (the UK Statutory Instrument has been laid]

Brexit day is 31st October – the Brexit time is 12.00 CET on that day.

At a European Council (Article 50) yesterday, all Parties agreed to extend the Article 50 period to 31st October. Accordingly, the UK will leave the EU at 12.00 CET on 31st October 2019. Withdrawal will take effect on 1st November 2019.

The EU Decision taken in Agreement with the UK is here.

The Exit day Statutory Instrument (SI) will now be laid to change the Exit day in local law. I will update this post with that SI (which will be laid via the negative procedure, without debate in Parliament).

The Statute Book will remain as is. The Brexit Law List will remain separate. The Brexit Law will operate from 1st November 2019. We will continue consolidating the Brexit Law into the UK Statute Book, but this will not show on Cardinal Environment EHS Legislation Registers & Checklists until after 1st November. Please refer to the Brexit Law List for the new rules.

The new rules will apply from 1st November 2019. The dates will be changed in Brexit Notices and Instructions.

Please note : whilst the EU might reissue its EU Brexit Contingency Measures with new dates, it again might not. I posted yesterday with the graphic of the expiry dates of the EU Brexit Contingency Measures.

Re – the (unratified) Withdrawal Agreement (WA) – extension of the Article 50 period does not change the 31st December 2020 date (Transition Period end) in that Agreement.

The date of the new UK Brexit Immigration System (1st January 2021) is also unchanged.

[the Brexit date may change again, please continue to follow this Blog]