UK Chemicals Regulation (UK Brexit)

Exit day is 31st October 2019

I posted before on UK Chemicals Regulation after UK Exit. This is a reminder post.

On the 25th March, HSE (the UK REACH chemicals regulator) published further instructions on access to UK REACH – here.

[the UK documents endlessly refer to a “Deal” – this is the Withdrawal Agreement, and for our purposes merely provides a new Exit day of 31st December 2020, not new trade arrangements with the EU]

These HSE instructions make it clear the online service ‘Comply with UK REACH’ will replace ECHA’s REACH-IT platform for UK REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals), from Exit day.

Live on Exit day, the new online system will allow:

* Businesses that have existing UK-held REACH registrations to validate their registrations (‘grandfathering’)

* Businesses that import chemicals from the EEA to submit downstream user import notifications

* Business to register new substance registrations or PPORD notifications (Product and Process Orientated Research and Development)

In order to minimise disruption to in the event of a no-deal Brexit, businesses that currently hold a REACH registration are encouraged to access their ECHA REACH-IT account and ensure that all the information relating to their business is downloaded. Information required to comply with UK REACH includes registration confirmation documents and ECHA decisions.

Under the new requirements, from Exit day –

* UK businesses that manufacture a chemical (those currently registered to EU REACH) will need to validate their existing registration with the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) within 120 days of the UK leaving the EU.

* UK businesses that import a chemical substance from the EU will need to notify HSE within 180 days of the UK leaving the EU.

* UK businesses that export chemicals to the EU will need to have an EU REACH registration in place once the UK leaves the EU.

In addition, more technical information will need to be submitted by businesses to HSE within two years of EU Exit.

Current HSE instructions are here.

[the Exit day may change, please continue to follow this Blog]

Chemical Regulation (UK Brexit)

UPDATE (22nd March) : the Minister’s reply is here.

I posted twice before on the ECHA window and the HSE resources. Find these in the Chemicals category.

Yesterday (6 March), the House of Lords European Union Committee wrote once again to the DEFRA Minister Coffey to highlight continuing concerns about readiness for UK Chemicals Regulation after 29 March.

In November 2018 the Committee published its Brexit: chemical regulation report, and since then has been corresponding with the Minister to monitor progress on the issues it identified. Its current view, based on the Minister’s latest letter (January 2019), the publication of the legislation that would implement a UK chemical regulation regime post-Brexit (see the Brexit Law List in subscribers’ systems), and new guidance from the European Chemicals Agency (the ECHA window I already posted about), is that:

(1) Some companies are not aware of the Government’s plans for post-Brexit chemical regulation

(2) It is not clear whether the Health and Safety Executive will have enough resources to perform its new tasks as the UK’s chemicals regulator

(3) The Minister has not stated whether the UK’s database of chemicals that are authorised for use in the UK will be ready in time, or explained the Government’s contingency plan for if the database is not ready on Brexit day

(4) Some chemical safety tests may need to be re-done, which would increase businesses’ costs, potentially reduce the number of chemicals available in the UK, and increase the amount of animal testing.

The Committee letter is here. I will update this post online, with any further information.

REACH and Pesticides (UK Brexit)

UPDATE (31 Jan 2019) : the Pesticides area is now elaborated with new guidance – here.

I posted before about HSE having the role of registering Chemicals (in the event of no deal), because there would no longer be access to ECHA. HSE has now elaborated its online presence a bit more, with guidance and instructions. This online presence also gives access (left hand side) to Pesticides instructions.

Here

In addition, a draft REACH Brexit statutory instrument was published. This is loaded into the Brexit Law List, accessed from subscribers’ Cardinal Environment EHS Legislation Registers & Checklists systems.

This draft instrument identifies the new domestic law will be a UK amended version of the EU REACH Regulation.

It is a complex draft instrument, it confirms the safety data sheets would be continued, with some changes, and confirms the downstream user obligations would also continue, again with some changes. The document is here.

In due course, we (Cardinal Environment) will produce a consolidated version of this new domestic law.

Please see this Chemical Watch analysis of the draft instrument, here.

In the event there is a deal, or a FTA, the law could change again. I will update this post, and/or issue a new port.

HSE Guidance (UK Brexit)

HSE has now created an online resource for the UK Brexit Notices (the ones it is dealing with) and it’s own guidance for its new role in Chemicals Regulation (I posted about the new role for HSE recently). This online resource is here.

On this resource is new additional REACH guidance here.

Plus an important table with key dates here. Note the downstream user stipulations in this table.

Indicative Occupational Exposure Limits (EU)

Directive 2017/164/EU – indicative occupational exposure limit values of 31 January 2017 establishing a fourth list of indicative occupational exposure limit values pursuant to Council Directive 98/24/EC, and amending Commission Directives 91/322/EEC, 2000/39/EC and 2009/161/EU (Text with EEA relevance) – is in force.

The Cardinal Environment EHS Legislation Registers and Law Checklists have the third list of indicative occupational exposure limit values. The fourth list is being added shortly.

The fourth list is based on Council Directive 98/24/EC concerning the protection of the health and safety of workers from the risks related to chemical agents in the workplace. This was the case for previous indicative lists.

Indicative occupational exposure limit values (IOELV) are health-based, non-binding values, derived from the most recent scientific data available and taking into account the availability of reliable measurement techniques.

For any chemical agent for which an IOELV has been set at European Union level, Member States are required to establish a national occupational exposure limit value. They also are required to take into account the European Union limit value, determining the nature of the national limit value in accordance with national legislation and practice.

Member States shall bring into force the laws, regulations and administrative provisions necessary to comply with this Directive by 21 August 2018 at the latest.

Regarding the limit values for nitrogen monoxide, nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide, Member States will be able to benefit from a transitional period ending at the latest on 21 August 2023.

The 2017 Directive establishes limit values for the following chemical agents:

Manganese and inorganic manganese compounds (as manganese)

Glycerol trinitrate

Carbon tetrachloride; Tetrachloromethane

Amitrole

Acetic acid

Hydrogen cyanide (as cyanide)

Methylene chloride; Dichloromethane

Vinylidene chloride; 1,1-Dichloroethylene

Tetraethyl orthosilicate

Acrylic acid; Prop-2-enoic acid

Nitroethane

Bisphenol A; 4,4′-Isopropylidenediphenol

Diphenyl ether

2-ethylhexan-1-ol

1,4-Dichlorobenzene; p-Dichlorobenzene

Acrolein; Acrylaldehyde; Prop-2-enal

Methyl formate

But-2-yne-1,4-diol

Tetrachloroethylene

Ethyl acetate

Sodium cyanide (as cyanide)

Potassium cyanide (as cyanide)

Diacetyl; Butanedione

Carbon monoxide

Calcium dihydroxide

Calcium oxide

Sulphur dioxide

Lithium hydride

Nitrogen monoxide

Nitrogen dioxide

Terphenyl, hydrogenated

Skin absorption feature of ten substances is noted.

Of the 33 substances above, 4 were already listed in the Annex to Commission Directive 91/322/EEC, one was listed in the Annex to Commission Directive 2000/39/EC and one in the Annex to Commission Directive 2009/161/EU. The establishment of new indicative limit values was recommended by SCOEL for the above six substances listed in the Annex to this Directive. They will be deleted from the Annexes to the previous directives on 21 August 2018.

The further lists on indicative occupational exposure limit values (in Cardinal Environment EHS Legislation Registers and Law Checklists):

• Commission Directive 91/322/EEC establishing indicative limit values

• Commission Directive 2000/39/EC establishing a first list of indicative occupational exposure limit values

• Commission Directive 2006/15/EC establishing a second list of indicative occupational exposure limit values

• Commission Directive 2009/161/EU establishing a third list of indicative occupational exposure limit values

UK – the EH40 list is reissuedhere (and will be added shortly to Registers and Law Checklists)

Ditto the Ireland list is updated, and Continental European Registers and Law Checklists will have their current lists updated.

HSE ‘Helping Great Britain Work Well’ (UK)

Britain’s Health and Safety Executive has a new 2016 health and safety system strategy  – it’s called ‘Helping Great Britain work well’.

The new strategy is located here. Subscribers to Cardinal Environment Tailored EHS Legislation Registers should email me if they wish this to be added to OHS Register 101 in their websystem. The strategy does not supplant the existing enforcement approaches.

Six strategic themes : key points

  • There needs to be broader ownership of health and safety
  • It is important to highlight and tackle the costs of work-related ill health
  • Wider recognition is needed of the business benefits that come with proportionate approaches to risk
  • Too many SMEs are still unaware that straightforward advice and simple guidance is available that can help them manage their health and safety responsibilities
  • We all need to horizon scan and ‘design-in’ effective risk management of new or emerging technologies and business modelsThere are benefits for Great Britain and British industries by promoting our health and safety approach around the world