Export Health Certificates (NI Brexit)

Exit day is 31st October (this date is set out in a statutory instrument)

An Export Health Certificate (EHC) is an official document that confirms a food or animal export meets the health and quality requirements of the importing country.

The EHC has to be signed by a vet or other qualified person in the exporting country after they have inspected the goods.

Food products being imported into the EU from a non-member state require EHCs.

They’re signed by vets to assure the importing country that produce is safe and without them trade can’t happen.

Around 18,000 of them a year are currently produced in Northern Ireland mostly to cover the trade in live animals to Britain.

This Blog does not cover animal or food trade, but many have asked me questions on this matter, and so here is my Blog post.

Various persons raise the issue of scarcity of vets and EHC costs, in Northern Ireland. It is possible the UK could cut a deal that would see it follow the EU’s rules for a period after Brexit, allowing trade to continue while a permanent arrangement was worked out. But this would not get around the need for a huge number of trade certificates, in any event.

DAERA (the relevant NI agency) says it is recruiting new staff and retraining existing ones to cope with the new trading arrangements.

“While we anticipate that current trade will adjust, it is difficult to gauge demand for certification as businesses may not make decisions until post Brexit. We are currently assessing the resources available and how we will prioritise based on the potential scale of the demands.”

It is encouraging businesses to sign up to advice workshops it’s beginning to run from next week.

Goods Moving between Ireland & Northern Ireland (UK Brexit)

I posted before about the international border on the island of Ireland.

Exit day is 12th April 2019.

[A] From Ireland (EU) to Northern Ireland (UK) after 12th April 2019

* No new requirements or checks on goods moving between Northern Ireland and Great Britain.

* Northern Irish traders must make declarations if they trade in dangerous chemicals, ozone depleting substances or F-gases (as the rest of UK – rUK).

* Northern Irish traders must use Belfast International Airport as the designated point of entry into Northern Ireland for endangered species.

* Northern Irish companies must have a licence to export dual-use goods (as rUK).

* Northern Irish companies must make declarations if they import animals and animal products from outside the EU that have not been checked in the EU. [this is different to rUK – for rUK see here]

* Northern Irish companies must follow rUK rules for importing plant products from Ireland – see here.

These are the only new processes which will be introduced.

Information on the temporary special Customs arrangements is here. This Blog does not focus on Customs, Tariffs or VAT aspects of borders.

[B] From Northern Ireland (UK) to Ireland (UK) after 12th April 2019

No announcements are yet made on the Irish Border specifics.

Follow this site for information on the Irish arrangements for its trade with the UK – here.

[the exit day may change, please keep following this Blog]

I will Blog again on this subject when further information is available.