International Road Haulage (UK Brexit)

Exit day is 31st October.

Instructions are now updated re International Road Haulage –

(1) EC Community Licences for International Haulage – here.

(2) International Road Haulage : operator licences and permits – here.

(3) ECMT international road haulage permits – here.

The instruction states (correctly) – most international journeys can be completed until 31 December 2019 without ECMT permit.

The instruction does not state, however, this is due to an EU temporary Brexit waiver rule. The instruction makes no mention of applying to the EU to roll this over.

(4) Carry out international road haulage after Brexit – here.

UK Brexit Preparedness – Medicines (UK Brexit)

Exit day is 31st October (127 days)

Today, 26th June, sees the following :

(1) Ministerial Statement – here

(2) Letter to Suppliers re Medicines – here

Ministerial Statement – extracts

Guaranteeing the supply of critical ‘category 1’ goods, including medicines, medical products, veterinary medicines and chemicals remains an essential element of the Government’s No Deal contingency planning. The Government is therefore undertaking steps to secure freight capacity for suppliers of these goods in a No Deal scenario.

The Department of Health and Social Care is starting the process of setting up an express freight contingency arrangement to support continuity of supply of medicines and medical products. This will be an urgent contingency measure for products requiring urgent delivery, within a 24-48 hour timeframe, if the UK leaves the EU without a deal. This express freight contingency arrangement forms part of the Department’s multi-layered approach, which includes rerouting medical supplies from the short strait crossings, extra warehouse space, stockpiling, buffer stocks, clarifying regulatory requirements, supporting traders to have all necessary paperwork in place at the border, and strengthening the processes used to deal with shortages to ensure that patients have uninterrupted access to medicines and medical products if the UK leaves the EU without a deal. Government will only pay for capacity as and when it is needed and used. This will be designed to cover all of the UK. The Department will be writing to industry to set out further details of these preparations.

The Department for Transport is putting in place a freight capacity framework agreement that will provide government departments with the ability to secure freight capacity for our critical supply chains as and when required. This framework does not commit the Government to purchasing or reserving any freight capacity, but it does provide a flexible list of operators and options for the provision of the capacity that can be drawn upon if needed.

In the coming months, the Government will make further announcements on its preparations for a possible No Deal Exit on 31 October, including on trade continuity agreements to limit disruption to our trade with third countries after we leave the EU.

Letter to Suppliers re Medicines – extracts

All no-deal preparedness plans should contain a mix of the following, depending on each company’s specific situation:

–  Secured capacity for rerouting freight away from the short straits after no-deal exit day, in order to avoid the worst restrictions on flow outlined above.

–  Stockpiling product above and beyond business-as-usual inventory levels; as a default, this is recommended as six weeks’ stock above business as usual inventory, the same as last time.

–  Assurance on the readiness of a company’s logistics and supply chains to meet the new customs and border requirements for both import and export (sometimes referred to as “trader readiness”).

Where companies have not yet done so [made a plan] the Government asks that they build a plan which includes a stockpile of an additional six weeks’ supply in the UK, on top of operational buffer stocks, in addition to developing a robust re-routing plan away from the short straits. As before, for products with a short shelf life or where production constraints mean stockpiling is not possible, for example, medical radioisotopes, we ask for alternative air freight plans to be made.

In the coming days, companies will be asked to provide information at product level, focused on the minimum key data set necessary for assurance of the programme. This will build on information from the 29th March exercise, including stock levels expected to be held on 31st October and plans for re-routing away from the short straits.

International Road Haulage (UK Exit)

Exit day is 31st October 2019

Whilst the UK is in the EU, road transport continues as usual. Once the UK leaves the EU, road transport to and in the EU will be subject to new arrangements.

International ECMT permits were oversubscribed in the first round, accordingly the UK opened a new round of ECMT permit applications in March 2019 –

The government has secured additional ECMT permits at the ECMT Road Transport Group meeting. These include both Euro V and Euro VI permits. There are now:

• 1,320 annual Euro VI permits

• 290 annual Euro V permits

• 3,744 short-term Euro VI permits (valid for 30 days)

• 1,080 short-term Euro V permits (valid for 30 days)

Annual permits cover all journeys made using the permit between 1 January and 31 December 2019. Monthly permits are valid for all journeys within 30 days of the start date listed on the permit.

UK hauliers will be able to carry on doing work to and from the EU, after the 31st October 2019 for a short time, under the EU Contingency law enacted (see diagram). This law allows UK registered operators to carry out road haulage to EU member states until 31 December 2019. The new rules were approved by the EU Parliament and Council in March and allow most journeys without a permit until 31 December 2019:

• travel to any EU member state (empty or laden) and return (empty or laden)

• a limited amount of ‘cross-trade’ or ‘cabotage’ work

• the EU law does not allow permit free access to non-EU countries – an ECMT permit will be required (after Exit) to transit EU member states to a 3rd countries such as Switzerland or Turkey.

I will update this post or issue a new Blog post when the arrangements for 2020 are announced.

Enquiries should be made to the UK Department for Transport.

DFDS Ferry Customer Checklists (UK Brexit)

Exit day is 12th April (this Friday)

The DFDS Brexit Checklists are here.

What is DFDS? – DFDS is a ferry operator.

This Blog does not do company endorsements. The DFDS Brexit Checklists are useful.

[the Exit day may change, please keep following this Blog]

Road Haulage (NI Brexit)

UPDATE : the EU Council has now agreed its position on basic road connectivity – here.

There is uncertainty in the haulage industry about what will happen at EU borders if the UK leaves without a Brexit deal next month.

Back in November, the UK Government issued guidance to UK hauliers stating that they “might need ECMT permits to transport goods in the EU and European Economic Area (EEA)” if there is no deal by 29 March.

The European Conference of Ministers of Transport (ECMT) permits can be used in a list of 43 countries which have signed up to the international arrangement.

The deadline for 2019 applications expired on 18 January 2019 and on Saturday night, many hauliers were informed on whether or not they were successful. I posted earlier about the deadline.

ECMT permits were over-subscribed and allocated on a points-based system, with higher scores awarded to firms who make a larger number of journeys into EU member states.

It would appear the Department for Transport (DfT) did not take into account journeys to the Republic of Ireland from Northern Ireland operators, whereas English, Scottish or Welsh hauliers were credited with their journeys to the Republic of Ireland.

Just over 1,200 permits were available for the UK as a whole and it is likely only 60-70 were made available to Northern Ireland firms.

In its guidance issued last year, the Government said it expected that Northern Ireland hauliers “will not need an ECMT permit” to drive to or through the Republic of Ireland.

It stated it would not require Republic of Ireland hauliers to have ECMT permits to operate in Northern Ireland.

It added that the UK was seeking a reciprocal agreement from the Irish government to allow Northern Ireland hauliers to travel across the Irish border without a permit.

I posted earlier that the European Commission (in its Contingency Plan) has proposed legislation that would allow UK hauliers basic rights (on a reciprocal basis) to conduct operations to, from and through the EU for a limited period of nine months after exit, if there is no deal.

“The Commission’s proposal will need to be agreed by the Council and European Parliament, and is being considered by both institutions urgently.” (UK Transport Minister, by statement last week)

The minister said he laid legislation before Parliament last week to provide for that access. [this will be included in the Brexit Law List, added to Cardinal Environment EHS Legislation Registers and Law Checklists]

Border changes : partnership pack (UK Brexit)

In a major update and bringing together of already issued instructions, the new Partnership Pack (borders) is now issued. Here

Please note the Hauliers sections, and the sections for Specialist Traders.

Note : I already posted about bi laterals in place to continue existing transboundary waste movement contracts. But note the further work that needs to be done in this area.