EU Law in UK 2021 (3) (Northern Ireland Brexit)

Exit day is next Friday.

The UK states the Transition Period will end on 31st December, and not a later date.

From 1 Jan 2021, whilst GB will not accept new EU law with implementation dates beyond the end of the Transition Period, Northern Ireland will stay aligned with those EU rules that are relevant to this Blog –

(1) legislation on product requirements

(2) sanitary rules for veterinary control (“SPS rules”)

(3) rules on agricultural production and marketing

Annex 2 to the (Withdrawal Treaty Northern Ireland/Ireland) Protocol lists the areas in which Northern Ireland will stay aligned with EU product/technical standards. The areas (relevant for our purposes) are as follows:

• goods—general provisions (including product safety);
• motor vehicles, including tractors;
• lifting appliances;
• gas appliances;
• pressure vessels;
• measuring instruments;
• construction products and machinery;
• electrical and radio equipment;
• textiles and footwear;
• cosmetics and toys;
• explosives and pyrotechnics;
• medicinal products;
• medical devices;
• substances of human origin;
• chemicals;
• pesticides and biocides;
• waste;
• environment and energy efficiency;
• marine equipment;
• food—general, hygiene, ingredients, contact material, and, other matters;
• animal feed—products and hygiene;
• Genetically Modified Organisms;
• live animals, germinal products and products of animal origin;
• plant reproductive material;
• sanitary and phytosanitary standards;
• ‘other’, including provisions relating to crude oil, tobacco, crystal glass, weapons.

This means the 2019 Single-Use Plastics Directive would be implemented in Northern Ireland, as it would be in Ireland.

Northern Ireland systems (subscribers’ EHS Legislation Registers & Checklists) are marked Brexit Transition, as are GB systems and GB variants (England, Scotland, Wales), but please note the Register layout will differ (to take account of the Protocol).

Please continue to follow this Blog, as further details emerge.

Transition Period (UK Brexit)

Exit day is next Friday.

The UK has now published Brexit access pages styled “Transition Period” – these pages are here.

However, few, if any, of the linked Guidance documents are updated.

This Blog does not focus on Tariffs. Here is the linked Guidance document about temporary import tariffs. Note this document is last updated on 8th October.

In practice, this policy on temporary import tariffs is likely to be reversed. The Times has a story about this, this morning, here.

The UK is expected to publish its negotiating objectives (for its trade deal with the EU) in February at the same time as the EU publishes theirs.

Please look out for further Blog posts in this area.

Withdrawal Agreement Bill (UK Brexit)

Exit day is 31st January (next Friday)

The Withdrawal Agreement Bill is now enacted as the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Act 2020 (the UK 2020 Act). It amends the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, and will be added to the Brexit Law List, in the EHS Legislation Registers & Checklists of subscribers systems.

The Bill was enacted unaltered. I already Blog posted about the Bill contents before Christmas. The Bill Explanatory Notes are here.

In brief :

(1) The EU-UK Withdrawal Treaty is now ratified on the UK side.

(2) The EU-UK Withdrawal Treaty is here (ratification is proceeding on the EU side).

(3) The UK must set up an Independent Monitoring Authority to oversee the citizen rights elements of the Withdrawal Treaty.

(4) Both sides must set up the Joint Committee, and its sub-committees, to manage implementation of the Withdrawal Treaty.

(5) A transition period will commence from 1st February and last until 31st December 2020 (the UK 2020 Act terms this an Implementation Period).

(6) The Withdrawal Treaty provides for a single extension of the transition period for up to one or two years, the final date for application for this is end June.

The UK 2020 Act prevents the application. So for an application to be made, a further Act would need to be enacted on this point.

(7) The Northern Ireland/Ireland Protocol to the Withdrawal Treaty commences at the end of the transition period. I blog posted already about this Protocol. The UK 2020 Act stipulates the Protocol will be enacted by Regulations made under the UK 2020 Act.

(8) During the transition period, nothing substantive changes for business or citizens, and the Brexit Law statutory instrument changes to UK domestic law are delayed until 1st Jan 2021.

Hence, subscribers existing EHS Legislation & Registers are relabelled Brexit Transition.

(9) From 1st Feb, the UK is free to make trade deals, these trade deals could alter domestic law.

(10) From 1st Jan 2021, the Brexit Law statutory instrument changes to UK domestic law have legal effect. These freeze UK domestic law implementation of EU law as at 31st Dec 2020. In practice, however, the vast bulk of the UK Brexit Law was enacted in March/April 2019, and so unless reissued, it reflects EU law at that date.

Some EU law will need implementing in 2020.

I wrote separate Blog posts about EU Law in UK 2020 and EU Law in UK 2021.

During 2020, please expect to see further Blog posts on this topic.

EU Law in UK 2021 (UK Brexit)

Exit day is 31st January (end of this month)

Implementation period completion day is 31st December (this is the end of the transition period)

The Chancellor speaking to the Financial Times, confirms there will be no dynamic alignment with EU Law after 2020.

I am not yet clear which laws will diverge, but please note the Brexit laws allow divergence, for example the Brexit Agriculture Bill provides for England, Wales and Northern Ireland to create their own marketing standards (Scotland will need to enact its own Brexit Agriculture Bill).

The EU Exit regulations (statutory instruments) we (Cardinal Environment) are consolidating into domestic law only deal with the pre-Brexit period to end Dec 2020.

It is the FT front page today (Saturday 18th January) and the lead on BBC online.

EU Law per se will not apply anyway. Note, there may be some long tail implementation left over from pre-Brexit that will be implemented.

We (Cardinal Environment) are already consolidating the EU Exit regulations into domestic law, and creating the Retained EU Law (EU Regulations, not Directives, that are adopted). Progress in this project can be seen by clicking the Brexit Consolidated Law List on the top right hand side of EHS Legislation Registers & Checklists homepages (both ENV and OHS).

We are working to the deadline of 31st December 2020 for completion of this project.

In addition, EHS Legislation Registers & Checklists will see the home page choice of ENV or OHS have additional Post-Brexit choices, and the existing links relabelled Pre-Brexit.

The Post-Brexit links will direct to shadow Registers & Checklists that will run from the end of Q1 to hit the end Dec 2020 deadline, for switch over to Post-Brexit.

Post-Brexit shadow Registers & Checklists running in 2020 will have Brexit Consolidated Law loaded (accessibility will stay from the main Brexit Consolidated Law list), and will display a changed Register layout.

Post-Brexit EHS Legislation Registers layout – EU Law will be moved from the top to below Guidance. We will still supply up to date EU Law to UK customers, but this is where it will be found. Retained EU Law will be displayed at the top of the Register.

Stormont Re-Start (Northern Ireland)

Following acceptance by political parties in Northern Ireland of The New Decade, New Approach Deal, Stormont will re-start after three years.

This means restoration to full operation of all the institutions of the Belfast (Good Friday) Agreement, including the Executive, the Assembly, the North South Ministerial Council, the British-Irish Council and the British-Irish Intergovernmental Conference.

The following commitments in The New Decade, New Approach Deal are relevant for our purposes –

(1) The Executive will create an Executive Sub-Committee on Brexit.

The sub-committee will be chaired by the First Minister and deputy First Minister (or their nominated Ministerial representatives). The sub-committee will have at least one representative from each party on the Executive. As a matter of urgency the sub-committee will consider Brexit-related issues and will initiate, as soon as is practicable, an assessment of the impact of Brexit on the institutions and North/South and East/West relationships. The work of the sub-committee will be scrutinised by an Assembly Committee.

(2) The Executive will establish a central Translation Hub in the Department of Finance within three months of an agreement, in order to provide language translation services for the 9 Executive Departments, Arm’s Length Bodies, Local Government and Public Bodies.

The Assembly’s Standing Orders will also be amended to allow any person to conduct their business before the Assembly or an Assembly Committee through Irish or Ulster Scots. A simultaneous translation system will be made available in the Assembly to ensure that a person without Irish or Ulster Scots is not placed at a disadvantage.

(3) Representatives from the Northern Ireland Executive will be invited to be part of the UK delegation in any meetings of the UK-EU Specialised Committees or the Joint Committee discussing Northern Ireland specific matters which are also being attended by the Irish Government as part of the European Union’s delegation.

A powerful Joint Committee is established under the (international treaty) EU-UK Withdrawal Agreement to oversee that Agreement (for orderly UK exit from the EU). This Joint Committee will have Specialised Committees.

(4) The UK government will legislate to guarantee unfettered access for Northern Ireland’s businesses to the whole of the UK internal market, and ensure that this legislation is in force for 1 January 2021. The UK government will engage in detail with a restored Executive on measures to protect and strengthen the UK internal market.

The Deal, alongside its two annexes, represents a possible outline of a Programme for Government. The parties agree to publish, within two weeks of the restoration of the institutions, the fuller details of an agreed Programme for Government. The parties recognise that the final Programme for Government will need to be agreed by the parties who form the Executive.

Within its first month of operation, the Executive will publish a legislative programme and indicative timescales which will complement the Programme for Government.

The following are relevant Deal commitments –

(1) The Executive will make its first priority to ensure the best possible Brexit outcome for citizens and the economy, reflecting the priorities set out in the letter of August 2016 from the First Minister and deputy First Minister to the Prime Minister.

(2) The Executive will invest urgently in wastewater infrastructure (the Living With Water Programme) which is at or nearing capacity in many places across Northern Ireland, including in Belfast.

(3) The Executive will tackle climate change with a new Energy Strategy to address the immediate and longer term impacts of climate change, and set targets and actions for transition to a zero carbon society.

The parties agree that, within 3 months, the new Executive will publish a comprehensive timetable for the development and delivery of this and other strategies necessary to achieve the outcomes in the Programme for Government.

(4) The Executive will introduce legislation and targets for reducing carbon emissions in line with the Paris Climate Change Accord.

Specifically, –

* the Executive will bring forward a Climate Change Act

* the Executive will establish an independent Environmental Protection Agency

* the Executive will create a plan to eliminate plastic pollution

* the RHI (Renewable Heat Initiative) will be closed down and replaced by a scheme that cuts carbon emissions.

Please also note the statements made by the Irish Government which also summarises the Brexit supports available to border regions.

The Deal document is here.

Export-Import (Hops) (UK Brexit)

Exit day is 31st January (end of this month)

Transition Period end date is 31st December (end of this year)

Instructions for trading with the EU (hops and hop products, an agricultural product) after Exit day are set out here. Note these set out in No Deal scenario format – I have adjusted below.

I am posting this Blog because it illustrates the UK approach for trade with the EU in those agricultural products, post Brexit, for which the EU has marketing standards.

Pre-Brexit

Hops marketed in the EU must meet rules on marketing standards. This includes hops extracts, hop cones and ground, pellets or powdered hops cones.

To show that they meet these standards, imports to the UK:

• from non-EU (third) countries, must have an Attestation of Equivalence

• from the EU, must have an EU hops certificate

The UK inspection agency is the Rural Payments Agency (RPA) – this agency inspects at least 5% of hops imports from each non-EU country. The UK does not currently inspect imports of hops from the EU.

Hops produced in the UK are issued with EU hops certificates from hops certification centres. With some exceptions, the certificates are needed for:

• marketing hops in the EU (including the UK)

• exporting hops

Post-Brexit

UK certification centres will still issue hops certificates for hops produced in the UK.

UK hops certification centres must remove all EU branding (including references to the EU and the EU emblem) from certificates from Exit day (or from the end of the Transition Period). The form of the certificate and the process for getting a certificate will not change.

Hops imported into the UK (after Exit day or after the end of the Transition Period) must be accompanied by one of the following as evidence that they meet UK marketing standards:

• the new UK Attestation of Equivalence issued by an authorised third country agency

• EU Attestation of Equivalence issued by an authorised third country agency (can be used until 31 October 2021)

• EU certificate for hops imported from the EU (can be used until 31 October 2021) – this must comply with EU rules and can be issued by a body authorised by an EU member state

After 31 October 2021, all hop imports from the EU and other third countries must be accompanied by a new UK Attestation of Equivalence. This must be issued by an authorised third country agency. A list of these agencies will be published on GOV.UK following EU exit. Agencies currently registered with the EU will be registered with the UK when the UK leaves the EU.

The UK may stop accepting EU Attestations of Equivalence and EU certificates before 31 October 2021 if EU marketing standards for hops do not meet UK standards.

The EU only accepts imports of hops accompanied by an EU Attestation of Equivalence, issued by an authorised agency in the exporting third country.

The UK government intends to apply to the EU to list RPA as the UK agency authorised to issue Attestations of Equivalence. RPA will not be able to issue Attestations of Equivalence until the listing with the EU is complete.

Further details will be published when they are available. However, an exporter must first enrol with RPA to export hops after Brexit.

Other details are set out in the instructions.

New Rules from the Trade Deal

The instructions are currently silent on new rules from the Trade Deal.

Brexit Instructions (UK Brexit)

Exit day is 31st January 2020 (at the end of the month)

Happy New Year!

As of today, 2nd January 2020, the entry page to the online UK Brexit instructions (found at the base of any online gov dot uk page) does not –

(1) stipulate the transition period end date (it currently is 31st December 2020), nor

(2) identify new rules that would change the No Deal baseline

As more information comes online and is published, I will issue applicable Blog posts. Please look out for them.