Waste (EU)

In 2015 the European Commission proposed revisions to existing EU waste law. Four new revising EU Directives were proposed (known as the Circular Economy Package) :

(1) revision to the EU Waste Directive

(2) revision to the EU Packaging and Packaging Waste Directive

(3) revision of the EU Landfill Directive

(4) revision of the EU End-of-life Vehicles Directive, the Batteries and Waste Batteries Directive, and The WEEE Directive.

Key elements of the 2015 waste proposal are:

  • A common EU target for recycling 65% of municipal waste by 2030;
  • A common EU target for recycling 75% of packaging waste by 2030;
  • A binding landfill target to reduce landfill to maximum of 10%of municipal waste by 2030;
  • A ban on landfilling of separately collected waste;
  • Promotion of economic instruments to discourage landfilling;
  • Simplified and improved definitions and harmonised calculation methods for recycling rates throughout the EU;
  • Concrete measures to promote re-use and stimulate industrial symbiosis –turning one industry’s by-product into another industry’s raw material;
  • Economic incentives for producers to put greener products on the market and support recovery and recycling schemes (eg for packaging, batteries, electric and electronic equipment, vehicles).

Provisional agreement was reached in December 2017 in the final stage of the EU law making process :

* Revised common EU targets for municipal waste recycling – at least 55% by 2025, 60% by 2030, 65% by 2035,

* 10% cap on landfill by 2035,

* provisions for countries to restrict the use of single-use plastics,

* improvements in the traceability of hazardous substances in products and waste,

* decontamination of hazardous waste,

* restrictions on oxo-degradable plastics and planned obsolescence.

The final analysis of the agreed text will take place under the new Bulgarian presidency (that has commenced in January 2018) with a view to confirm the agreement.

After formal approval, the new legislation will be submitted to the European Parliament for a vote at first reading and to the Council for final adoption.

The new laws will come into force in 2018 and will then need to be transposed to into national legislation.

THIS POST WILL BE UPDATED WHEN THE AGREED LAW TEXT IS PUBLISHED – the revised EU laws will be loaded into EHS Legislation Registers at that point.