EU Drinking Water Directive (EU)

The current Drinking Water Directive 98/83/EC last amended in 2015, is replaced by a new Drinking Water Directive (EU) 2020/2184 in force 12th January 2021. Member states have two years to bring in national legislation. We will add this Directive to Cardinal EHS Legislation Registers &a Checklists shortly.

The new EU Drinking Water Directive is here.

Key features of the revised Directive are:

• Reinforced water quality standards which are more stringent than WHO recommendations.

• Tackling emerging pollutants, such as endocrine disruptors and PFA’s, as well as microplastics – for which harmonised analytical methods will be developed in 2021.

• A preventive approach favouring actions to reduce pollution at source by introducing the “risk based approach”. This is based on an in-depth analysis of the whole water cycle, from source to distribution.

• Measures to ensure better access to water, particularly for vulnerable and marginalised groups.

• Measures to promote tap water, including in public spaces and restaurants, to reduce (plastic) bottle consumption.

• Harmonisation of the quality standards for materials and products in contact with water, including a reinforcement of the limit values for lead. This will be regulated at EU level with the support of the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA).

• Measures to reduce water leakages and to increase transparency of the sector.

Drinking Water Directive (EU)

Provisional agreement on revision of the EU Drinking Water Directive was reached on 19th December.

The proposal updates to the latest changes to WHO safety standards.

Further details are here.

UK – if the revised EU Directive is published before 31st December, which it is likely to be, then it will apply in the UK (but local law would have to be updated).

Drinking Water Arsenic Settlement (US)

Settlement is announced today (fines) with the US Department of Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs for violation of the federal Safe Drinking Water Act at the Keams Canyon Public Water Supply system.

Here is the USEPA press release.

The Keams Canyon public water supply system, located on the Hopi Reservation, is owned and operated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and serves a population of approximately 2,000 people. The USEPA found the BIA exceeded drinking water standards for arsenic and failed to monitor for arsenic and disinfection compounds. The system is now fully compliant with these requirements.