More Technical Notices (UK Brexit Preparedness)

The UK has today issued further Brexit Preparedness Notices. The existing online location is updated – here.

Please note particularly :

(1) CE marking – in the “Labelling products and making them safe” group

(2) Driving

(3) BAT standards – in the “Protecting the environment” group

(4) F-gases and ODS – in the “Protecting the environment” group

(5) The three Notices in the “Travelling between the UK and the EU” group

(6) Oil and gas activities – in the “Regulating energy” group

(7) European Works Councils in the “Workplace rights” group (already issued)

Any questions, please email me.

Agriculture Bill 2017-19 (UK)

UPDATE : initial reaction from Scottish Ministers – here.

The Brexit bill – the Agriculture Bill 2017-19 was published today, its second reading is tomorrow. The document is here.

The Agriculture Bill (“the Bill”) will provide the legal framework for the United Kingdom (UK) to leave the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) and establish a new system based on public money for public goods for the next generation of farmers and land managers. It is the first Agriculture Bill to be published in 70 years.

The Agriculture Bill includes the following:

(1) Powers to give financial assistance and move towards a new system based on paying public money for public goods. Such payments may encompass (but are not limited to) environmental protection, public access to the countryside and measures to reduce flooding.

(2) Powers to collect and share data from those within or closely connected to the agri- food supply chain. The data collected and shared under these provisions will help farmers and producers increase productivity, help producers to manage risk and market volatility, and support animal and plant health and traceability.

(3) Powers to make regulations setting and amending marketing standards for agricultural products and to make provision about the classification of carcasses by slaughterhouses.

(4) Provisions to create a domestic system of recognition of Producer Organisations to encourage collaboration amongst growers. These provisions will provide for exemptions from competition law for recognised organisations.

(5) Provisions for the Secretary of State to make regulations imposing obligations on first purchasers of agricultural products in relation to contracts with producers. This is aimed at protecting producers and consumers from unfair trading practices.

Once the Bill becomes an Act of Parliament the following provisions will extend to England and Wales only:

(1) Part 1 which relates to new financial assistance powers
(2) Part 3 which relates to the collection and sharing of data
(3) Clause 20 which relates to the power to make regulations for marketing standards and carcass classification.

Schedule 3 extends mostly identical powers to the Welsh Ministers as those conferred on the Secretary of State in Parts 1-5 of the Bill.

Schedule 4 extends similar powers to DAERA (Northern Ireland) as those conferred on the Secretary of State in Parts 2-5 of the Bill.

The rest of the Act will extend to the UK. This is because the relevant provisions:

(a) Relate to a reserved matter; or
(b) Amend, or give powers to amend retained EU legislation which will extend to the UK. Such provisions may, however, apply more narrowly to a particular jurisdiction.

Annex A gives more information. Please refer to it for details re Scotland.

Brexit Law Tracker (UK)

UPDATE (6th Sept) : it is today confirmed around half of the new statutory instruments are needed in any event, and the rest are connected with the possible new UK-EU deal.

Four Brexit laws have Royal Assent and the Customs Bill (Taxation (Cross-border Trade)) passed its second reading in the Lords last night. No progress has yet begun on the Migration Bill, but all other Bills are underway or at White Paper consultation stage.

Some 800 new statutory instruments are now expected by February.

I will commence compiling in October the Brexit Law List for EHS Legislation Registers , so please look out for that appearing in systems.

Technical Notices (UK Brexit Preparedness)

UPDATE : government letter to the health care sector (this calls for stockpiling to ensure continuity of supply) – here.

The UK government has today issued its first tranche of Technical Notices in the subject area of UK Brexit Preparedness. These Technical Notices create requirements for Government to have online portals and other IT in place, and for stakeholders to use these, and make other arrangements.

The Technical Notices are here.

Please read the Notices carefully, any questions, please email them directly to me.

Energy Sector (UK Brexit Preparedness)

As with the Financial Sector, the UK government has advised it will issue Regulations to ‘onshore’ energy legislation. This communication is here.

Unless the forthcoming changes to energy legislation relate to the Climate Change Levy or other climate related areas, this Blog post will be the only Blog post I will write about the matter.

Carriage of Dangerous Goods (UK Brexit Preparedness)

The UK government is now consulting on new 2018 CDG Regulations (applicable in Britain) that will be brought forward to amend the CDG 2009 (the 2009 dated CDG Regulations that were amended in 2011) : the document is here

(separate amending regulations will be brought forward in Northern Ireland)

(1) to remove deficiencies arising from the UK’s exit from the European Union (EU), including textual amendments to definitions and requirements that are currently predicated on the UK being a Member State of the EU. The In-force day is the day that the UK exits the EU (“exit day”).

The amendments will maintain the dangerous goods regulatory framework and the international process behind it as it is today, including the GB Competent Authority’s power to grant authorisations and implement derogations. Those involved in the carriage of dangerous goods will continue to be required to follow the requirements of RID (for rail) and ADR (for road), in the same way as before EU exit.

The amendments are purely technical. They primarily amend definitions and requirements that are currently predicated on the UK being a Member State of the EU. For example, references to the UK being a “relevant Member State” are replaced with references to “relevant territory”. Textual amendments to CDG 2009 also make it clear that references to ADR and RID will continue to be to the latest versions of those documents, whereas references to the DG Directive and the Transportable Pressure Equipment Directive (2010/35/EU) will be to the versions of those Directives in force upon exit day. These new regulations will be cited as the Carriage of Dangerous Goods and Use of Transportable Pressure Equipment (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2018.

(2) to gather input for future changes – flexibility will continue on how dangerous goods regulation is implemented in the future, the UK government is seeking input on this.

In addition, the legal requirement for vapour recovery systems to be installed on mobile tanks is reinstated.

The Petroleum (Consolidation) Regulations 2014 mistakenly revoked regulation 5 of the Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road Regulations 1996 in its entirety. This regulation referenced, amongst other documents, the Approved Tank Requirements published by the Health and Safety Commission. These included the requirements for the design and construction of tanks in respect of the control of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions. Whilst the references to other documents were no longer required, the reference to the Approved Tank Requirements was.

This mistake is being rectified in a separate Statutory Instrument by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy. It is entitled [Radioactive Substances], [Transport] of Radioactive Material (Radiation Emergencies) Regulations 2018. Those Regulations will contain a reference to the Approved Tank Requirements concerning the provisions for vapour recovery systems of mobile containers carrying petrol.

Financial Sector (UK Brexit Preparedness)

Recently the UK updated its approach to ‘onshoring’ financial services and the guidance is here.

The necessary legislation (as statutory instruments) is now being drafted. There will be considerable numbers of these instruments.

Since financial services are not my area, I do not propose to Blog post further about these. So this Blog post is the only post I will write on this topic.

Financial services underpin a very wide range of ordinary daily commercial and domestic activities, such as for example the deposit guarantee scheme guarantees bank deposits. My suggestion is the reader finds someone who is tracking this subject and follow them also.