HSE Injuries & Fatalities Roundup (19th Feb) (UK)

Improper Asbestos Management (the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006) – Scottish health board guilty of safety failings resulting in worker exposure to asbestos fibres during a seven-year period. Fine is £10,000 for breach of Regulation 4(10)(b). Press release.

Roof Fall (Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974) – farming partnership guilty of safety failings after a worker sustains serious injuries from a fall from the roof of a cowshed during its dismantling. Fine is £6,670 for breach of Section 2(1). Press release.

Work Equipment Risk Failings (Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974) – groundworks company guilty of safety failings after a worker sustains a leg amputation after his leg is crushed between a tractor pulling a heavy water bowser and the bucket of a loading shovel. Fine is £32,000 for breach of Section 2(1). Press release.

Machinery Guarding Failings (angle grinder) (Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974) – company guilty of machinery safety failings after a worker is injured by an unguarded angle grinder. Fine is £8,000 plus costs of £8,985 for breach of Section 2(1). Press release.

Workplace Transport Failings (Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974) – farming business guilty of traffic routing safety failings after a pedestrian is killed by a forklift truck. Fine is £165,000 plus costs of £39,500 for breach of Section 2(1) and 3(1). Press release.

Machinery Stop Failings (saw) (Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974) – company guilty of failing to ensure an injection brake is fitted to a circular saw motor leading to the severing of employee fingers during blockage clearance. Fine is £6,000 plus costs of £2,418 for breach of Section 2(1). Press release.

Machinery Guarding Failings (steel pinch rolls) (Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974) – company guilty of safety failings after a worker’s hand became trapped in a pair of steel pinch rolls leading to crush injuries and the amputation of finger parts. Fine is £25,000 plus costs of £8,320 for breach of Section 2(1). Additional breaches are:
Regulation 11(1) of the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 which states: “Every employer shall ensure that measures are taken… to prevent access to any dangerous part of machinery or to any rotating stock-bar; or to stop the movement of any dangerous part of machinery or rotating stock-bar before any part of a person enters a danger zone.”
Regulation 3(1) of the Management of Health and Safety Regulations 1999 which states: “Every employer shall make a suitable and sufficient assessment of the risks to the health and safety of its employees to which they are exposed whilst they are at work.” Press release.

Ladder Fall (Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974) – owners of a business park guilty of work at height safety failings after a local worker fractures an ankle in a fall from a ladder while carrying out work in a disused premises nearby. Fine is £7,000 plus costs of £1,355 for breach of Section 3(1). Press release.

Lifting Equipment Failings (Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974) – manufacturer of chains for conveyor belts, escalators and forklift trucks guilty of not having a safe system for moving heavy tooling equipment, following worker hand injury (finger amputation). Fine is £80,000 plus costs of £12,696 for breach of Section 2(1). Press release.

Corporate Manslaughter Fine (Northern Ireland)

Fines were issued 15th October, plus costs, at Belfast’s Laganside Crown Court under Corporate Manslaughter legislation for health and safety failings that led to the death of 47 year-old employee. The conviction followed a joint Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) and Health and Safety Executive for Northern Ireland (HSENI) investigation into the fatal incident, which involved unguarded moving machinery, and took place on an animal feed mixing plant.

Under Corporate Manslaughter legislation companies and organisations can be found guilty as a result of serious management failures resulting in a gross breach of a duty of care.

Following the hearing, Kevin Campbell, an Inspector with HSENI’s Major Investigation Team said: “This case highlights the importance of proper management of health and safety in the workplace. Management need to ensure that all aspects of their work are adequately addressed, with appropriate measures put in place where necessary. The removal of safety guards from the machine and the continued use of the machine ultimately led to the death of Norman Porter. The company allowed the use of the unsafe machine.”

Machinery Safety Fine

Accident investigation finds failure to keep machinery and associated interlocking devices in effective working order caused a serious and preventable hand crushing injury.

See here for the Press Release giving details, following enforcement action taken by Britain’s Health & Safety Executive (HSE).

Update: another incident (30th September) is here – this time it is hand injuries sustained during food preparation.