EU Eco-Design & Energy Labelling (EU)

UPDATE : these new rules are now agreed – 10 Ecodesign regulations – press release – here.

The European Commission is currently working on eleven draft Ecodesign-regulations which are aimed at ecodesign requirements for various so-called energy-consuming products (the Ecodesign-regulations), and six Energy Labels.

With these Ecodesign-regulations, the Commission focuses, among other things, on the reparability of products in order to exploit a product’s full potential. The Commission aims to do this by introducing a set of repair requirements which should be met by manufacturers and importers by April 2021, in order to be able to keep marketing their products in the European Union (EU).

The current EU Eco-Design Directive is Directive 2009/125/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 21 October 2009 establishing a framework for the setting of eco-design requirements for energy-related products.

It establishes a framework for minimum eco-design requirements which goods that consume energy must meet before they can be used or sold in the EU. It does not apply to transport used to carry people or goods.

KEY POINTS

(1) Eco-design requirements cover all stages of a product’s life: from raw materials, manufacturing, packaging and distribution to installation, maintenance, use and end-of life.

(2) For each phase, various environmental aspects are assessed by bodies designated by EU countries. They verify aspects such as the materials and energy consumed, expected emissions and waste and possibilities for reuse, recycling and recovery.

(3) Manufacturers must construct an ecological profile of their products and use this to consider alternative design possibilities.

(4) Products which satisfy the requirements bear the CE marking and may be sold anywhere in the EU.

The Energy Efficiency Directive 2012/27/EU amended the 2009 legislation to further promote energy efficiency. It requires national authorities to do the following –

(1) Establish an indicative national energy efficiency target.

(2) Approve a long-term strategy to renovate residential and commercial buildings.

(3) Renovate, from 1 January 2014, 3 % of the total floor area of government-owned buildings.

(4) Introduce energy efficiency obligation schemes to achieve an annual 1.5 % energy saving by final customers between 1 January 2014 and 31 December 2020.

(5) Submit large enterprises to an independent energy audit from 2016.

(6) Ensure customers are billed on their actual consumption at least once a year.

(7) Inform the Commission, by 31 December 2015, of the potential for efficient co-generation and district heating and cooling.

The energy labelling requirements for individual product groups are created under the EU’s energy labelling framework regulation, in a process coordinated by the European Commission. 16 product groups require an energy label. 

Companies can create their own labels for energy efficiency using a range of labelling tools.

The ecodesign requirements for individual product groups are created under the EU’s ecodesign directive in a process also coordinated by the European Commission.

This is a list of energy efficient products Regulations: by product group – here.

This is the notice to stakeholders re UK Exit – here.

This is a FAQ on the EU Energy Labelling Regulation – here.

This is a FAQ on the EU Eco-Design Directive – here.

This is the Link to the useful CoolProducts summary of new Law proposals (the summary has links to each proposal) – here.

UK Exit Statement – the Exit day is 31st October 2019, unless these NEW EU proposals are enacted by that date, the UK is not bound (the UK is bound by existing EU law, incorporated as EU Retained Law).

Products sold IN the EU must comply.

A BBC summary is here.

IP and Brexit (UK Brexit)

Exit day is 31st October (this day is set out in a Statutory Instrument)

This Blog does not post on intellectual property. But, in the interests of completeness, and because the matter of exhaustion of IP rights is a (possibly overlooked) aspect of the circulation of goods, this Blog post publicises the UK Intellectual Property Office (IPO) instructions on IP and Brexit (updated today 11th September).

Here

Extract

Intellectual property rights give rights holders the right to control distribution and re-sale of a product that is protected by IP after they have been put on the market.

Currently, exhaustion of IP rights occurs in the UK when an IP-protected good is placed on the market anywhere in the European Economic Area (EEA). This means that rights holders (such as the owner of a brand) may not prevent the movement of those goods within the EEA. These goods are known as parallel goods, which are genuine goods (that is not counterfeit).

While the UK remains a full member of the EU, intellectual property rights remain exhausted after the first sale of a good. This is with the right holders permission and within the territory of the European Economic Area (EEA).

If there is a no-deal, the UK will continue to recognise EEA exhaustion so the rules affecting imports of goods into the UK will not change. Goods placed on the market [in the EU], after the UK has exited the EU, will continue to be considered exhausted in the UK. This means that parallel imports of these genuine goods from the EEA to the UK will continue unaffected.

However, there may be restrictions on the parallel export of goods from the UK to the EEA. This is because goods placed on the UK market, after the UK has exited the EU, will not be considered exhausted in the EEA.

Businesses that wish to export IP-protected goods to the EEA that have already been legitimately put on the market in the UK, may need the rights holder’s consent. All businesses may wish to seek legal advice on how this arrangement could affect their business model or intellectual property rights.

Manufactured Goods (UK Brexit)

Exit day is 31st October (this is the date in a Statutory Instrument)

Yesterday (10th Sept) HMG re-published its instructions on Manufactured Goods.

Here

I did Blog post these instructions in March, note the UKCA mark. The UKCA mark is not available yet. CE marks will continue for a temporary period.

The Sept publication has an update reminder that Distributors will be Importers.

By now, everyone should be Brexit Ready.

The specific text re Importers – (note the EEA and Switzerland reference)

If you are currently a UK distributor, you need to confirm whether you or your supplier will become an ‘importer’ once the UK leaves the EU. This will usually be the case if you are the one bringing goods into the UK from the EU, EEA or Switzerland, and want to put them on the UK market after Brexit.

If you are becoming an ‘importer’ you will need to ensure you understand your legal obligations. You will need to make sure:

• goods are labelled with your company’s details, including your company’s name and a contact address (for 18 months after Brexit you can provide these details on the accompanying documentation rather than on the good itself)

• the correct conformity assessment procedures have been carried out and that any good you import carries the correct conformity markings

• the manufacturer has drawn up the correct technical documentation and complied with their labelling requirements

• you maintain a copy of the declaration of conformity for a period of 10 years

• you do not place a good you import on the market if you have reason to believe it does not conform with the relevant essential requirements